Posted by: emapey | July 13, 2008

Understanding Faculty Adoption of New Teaching Technologies

Understanding Immature Technologies

The report analyzed each technology (time-sharing, client/server computing, LANs, relational databases, VLSI design, etc.) from first inception to the point where it turned into a billion dollar industry. What was consistent among virtually all the results was how long each took to move from inception to ubiquity. Twenty years of jumping around from university labs to corporate labs to products was typical. And 30 years, as with the mouse and RISC processors, was not at all unusual (and remember, this is the “fast-paced world of computers,” where it is “almost impossible” to keep up).
Source: Business Week

Understanding Immature Teaching Technologies

I think this creates a bit of a practice dilemma for the instructional technologist working with faculty members interested in exploring technology to support learning. As we take the time to learn about the next emerging tool – Twitter, Ning, Facebook, blogs, podcasting wikis, etc. – we forget that the vast majority of faculty we encounter in our work will not likely adopt these tools for years, if at all! By the time the long nose of innovation runs its course, entire new chapters of internet history will have been written. From this perspective it seems that most technological innovations in education are limited to the early adopter, constraining potential change on a wider scale.
Source: Techne

According to Rogers, innovations, such as the adoption of mobile learning or virtual learning worlds, catch on quickly in organizations when they have the characteristics which Rogers calls Attractiveness Criteria.
Source: Kapp Notes

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